Glenwood
October’s unknown ship brought only a few replies all of whom identified her as the Glenwood.

The winner of the October competition was Alan Blackwood of Troon.

Alan Blackwood writes:

I believe this month’s ‘unknown’ to be the 4,897 grt single screw tramp Glenwood, the second of a two ship order placed by John I. Jacobs & Co. Ltd. of London with Sir James Laing & Sons Ltd., Sunderland. Completed at the latter’s Deptford yard during April 1940, Glenwood had overall dimensions of 431’09” x 58’01” (131.6 x 17.7m). Her propulsion machinery consisted of a triple expansion steam engine constructed by N.E. Marine Engineering Co. (1938) Ltd. of Wallsend-on-Tyne & Sunderland and returned a maximum loaded service speed of 9.5 knots. Whilst she survived WW2 unscathed, her sister (Beechwood) did not, being torpedoed and sunk by U- 130 on 26th august 1942 whilst proceeding unescorted northbound off Liberia. Of the 44 aboard, one crew member was lost in the action. During 1948 Glenwood was sold for ongoing operations to Trader Navigation Co. Ltd., of London when renamed Durham Trader for employment serving primarily her owner’s grain trade core interests. Her boilers were converted to oil firing during February 1951. On 16th October 1957 she was in collision with the Gothenburg registered 1,978grt 1954 built short sea cargo ship Nordanvik in the Dover Strait and heavily damaged. During 1958 she was placed under the flag of India when sold to the great Eastern Shipping Co. Ltd. of Bombay (A.H.Bhiwandiwalla & Co. [Bombay] Pty.Ltd.) and renamed Jag Sevak. Whilst departing Visakhapatnam on 15th July 1965 with a consignment of cement and general cargo, she ran aground and was abandoned when declared a CTL.

 

Laurance Ward writes:

This month’s ship is the Glenwood, built by Sir James Laing and Sons Ltd., of Sunderland for John I. Jacobs and Co.Ltd., of London. Delivered in 1940, 4,897 grt, o’all length 438.10 feet, breadth 58.2 feet, depth 24.8 feet. T3cyl engines supplied by NE Marine Eng. Co., 365 NHP, designed speed 9.5 knots. Unlike her sister ship the Beechwood from the same yard, she survived the war. She was sold in 1948 to Trader Navigation Co. Ltd., of London, and renamed Durham Trader. In 1951 she was converted to burn fuel oil. Unfortunately, on 06/10/1957 she sustained considerable damage after a collision with the Nordanvik (Norwegian flag?), near Dover. in 1958 she was sold to great Eastern Shipping Co. Ltd., (A. H. Bhiwandiwalla & Co. (Bombay) Pty. Ltd., Bombay), and renamed Jag Sevak. On 15/07/1965 whilst leaving leaving Vizagapatam she ran aground causing considerable damage, and was abandoned as a constructive total loss.

 

Alan Blackwood writes:

I believe this month’s ‘unknown’ to be the 4,897 grt single screw tramp Glenwood, the second of a two ship order placed by John I. Jacobs & Co. Ltd. of London with Sir James Laing & Sons Ltd., Sunderland. Completed at the latter’s Deptford yard during April 1940, Glenwood had overall dimensions of 431’09” x 58’01” (131.6 x 17.7m). Her propulsion machinery consisted of a triple expansion steam engine constructed by N.E. Marine Engineering Co. (1938) Ltd. of Wallsend-on-Tyne & Sunderland and returned a maximum loaded service speed of 9.5 knots. Whilst she survived WW2 unscathed, her sister (Beechwood) did not, being torpedoed and sunk by U- 130 on 26th august 1942 whilst proceeding unescorted northbound off Liberia. Of the 44 aboard, one crew member was lost in the action. During 1948 Glenwood was sold for ongoing operations to Trader Navigation Co. Ltd., of London when renamed Durham Trader for employment serving primarily her owner’s grain trade core interests. Her boilers were converted to oil firing during February 1951. On 16th October 1957 she was in collision with the Gothenburg registered 1,978grt 1954 built short sea cargo ship Nordanvik in the Dover Strait and heavily damaged. During 1958 she was placed under the flag of India when sold to the great Eastern Shipping Co. Ltd. of Bombay (A.H.Bhiwandiwalla & Co. [Bombay] Pty.Ltd.) and renamed Jag Sevak. Whilst departing Visakhapatnam on 15th July 1965 with a consignment of cement and general cargo, she ran aground and was abandoned when declared a CTL.

 

Mike West writes:

The October unknown ship is the 4,897grt Cargo ship Glenwood, built in 1940 for J. Jacobs of London, who owned tramp steamers and tankers. In 1948 she became the Durham Trader and in 1958 she was sold to Indian buyers and renamed Jag Sevak. On 15th July 1965 she ran ashore off Visakhapatnam, India. She was heavily damaged and broke her back. She was a constructive total loss.

 

AD Frost writes:

October’s unknown ship is J. I. Jacobs’ SS Glenwood, built1940 by Jas. Laing & Sons. renamed Durham Trader in 1948. Damaged in a collision of Dover on 16.10.57 with Nordanvik. Sold in 1958 to great Eastern Shipping and renamed Jag Sevak. She ran aground on 15.7.65 while leaving Visakhapatnam and abandoned.

 

Mike Goadby writes:

This month’s unknown ship is the 4,897 grt steamship Glenwood, built for John I Jacobs & Co. Ltd., London, built by Sir James Laing at Sunderland in 1940. She was sold in 1948 to Trader Navigation Ltd. and renamed Durham Trader. She was sold in 1957 to great Eastern Shipping Co. of Bombay and renamed Jag Sevak. On 15th July 1965 she was leaving Visakhapatnam with cement and general cargo when she stranded and was so badly damaged she declared a C.T.L.

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